Current Issue: Better Heart Health No Matter What Your Age

Your heart is one of the hardest working muscles in your body. It’s constantly pumping blood. Heart disease can make it tough for your heart to do this job. Fortunately, research shows making healthy lifestyle changes—even later in life—may stop and actually reverse heart damage.

Back Issues

On a Statin? A Healthy Lifestyle Is Still Important

Statins are one of the most widely used drugs. They have helped many people lower their cholesterol. That, in turn, has lowered their risk for heart disease. Unfortunately, 2 recent studies found that some statin users may be ignoring other heart-healthy choices—namely, eating a low-fat diet and exercising regularly.

What Makes Red Meat So Unhealthy?

A juicy steak from the grill may seem like the perfect summer staple. But for your heart’s sake, you may want to pass on that piece of protein. Red meat—like beef, pork, and lamb—can be high in saturated fat and cholesterol. Plus, it contains another substance that may be bad for your heart: heme iron.

Can Airplane Noise Hurt Your Heart?

Airplanes have transformed travel. You can now reach far-away destinations in the same day. For people living under flight paths, though, airplane noise may be harmful to the heart. Recent research suggests it may raise the risk for heart disease and stroke.

Is Your Sweet Tooth Harming Your Heart?

You can’t sugarcoat this fact: Americans are eating too much sugar. We eat about 18 teaspoons of the sweetener every day. Although it tastes good, sugar isn’t very nutritious. What’s more, your sweet tooth may be bad for your heart.

Do You Have High Blood Pressure?

With every heartbeat, blood rushes through your body. It pushes against your artery walls. You can’t feel this force, even if it’s higher than it should be. That’s why many people don’t know they have hypertension, or high blood pressure.

What the New Cholesterol Guidelines Mean for You

Late last year, the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology issued new guidelines for treating high cholesterol. Their goal: to reduce heart disease and stroke. Here are key points you should know.

When Is It Safe to Have Sex After a Heart Attack?

A heart attack can change everything, even your sex life. You may wonder when you can have sex again or if it’s OK to do so. Research reveals many heart attack survivors are unsure about sexual activity. Talking with your doctor can ease your worries.

Sleeping Too Little, Too Much Linked to Heart Woes

Too little or too much sleep has been linked to a host of heart woes, according to a recent study. What’s considered just right? Seven to 9 hours of shut-eye.

Secondhand Smoke: Harmful to Your Heart

Smoking bans are lighting up across the U.S. Since 2000, more than half of all states and numerous municipalities have enacted laws that limit smoking in restaurants, bars, and public places. A recent study shows such changes may be a boon to heart health, particularly for nonsmokers.

Heart Rhythm Problem Becoming More Common

Your heart beats an average of 60 to 100 times every minute. Despite this constant movement, you probably don’t notice it. That isn’t always the case for the growing number of Americans who have atrial fibrillation, a heart rhythm problem.

Anger May Up the Ante for a Heart Attack

Anger is a powerful emotion. From a subdued simmer to an explosive tempest, it can stress the body. Past research has linked anger with heart disease. And now, a recent study suggests outbursts of ire may actually trigger a heart attack.

Joint Commission Gold Seal

Lourdes has been awarded the Joint Commission Gold Seal of Approval

Magent Logo

Lourdes has received
Magnet Recognition for Nursing Excellence

Commission on Cancer Logo

Outstanding Achievement Award by the American College of Surgeon’s Commission on Cancer

New York State Desginated Stroke Center

Lourdes is a New York State Designated Stroke Center

One of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Orthopedic Surgery

One of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Joint Replacement